Causes of Americas turn toward international invol

vementThe causes and signs of Americas sudden turn toward international involvement at the end of the nineteenth century were new markets, which were needed because of an increase in population, wealth, and production. The imperialistic tendencies of other nations, particularly Africa and China, caused competition for the United States and motivated them to seek out new territories. The popular yellow journalism of the time, which sought the attention of the public by sending artists and reporters to other nations, helped to steer the attention of the people towards other countries. A book by Josiah Strong called Our Country- Its Possible Future and Present Crisis, said that the US had a responsibility to spread its government, religion, and culture to backward nations. New markets would benefit the farmers by providing more places to sell their crops. The theory of Social Darwinism once again came into play stating that America was the most fit country and should therefore spread its influence onto other nations. The development of the new and improved Navy was advocated in Alfred Thayer Majans book The Influence of Sea Power, which stated that the key to world dominance was a strong Navy. This also helped to generate a push for a canal connecting the Atlantic and the Pacific. James Blaines support for the Big Sister Policy moved the country towards opening and expanding Latin American markets, and taking Latin American countries under its wing. Several small conflicts in places such as the Samoan Islands, Chile, Canada, Venezuela, and British Guiana helped to move the United States towards an establishment as a world power.
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